Tag Archives: Spiritual transformation

Joy in Our Call

1 Feb

Last year, the Lord gave me the word “Humility” to transform me. My word for 2014 seems to be “Joy.” Therefore, I’ve been looking at my collection of scriptures containing this powerful word. One verse jumped off the page, filling me with wonderful memories.

“Deceit is in the heart of those who devise evil, But counselors of peace have joy” Proverbs 12:20 NASB

I clearly remember driving home in the dark, tired but elated. I banged on the steering wheel and loudly announced to my empty car, “I love counseling!” So what if it was almost 10:00pm. When a couple worked at healing their marriage or a depressed client did the homework, I saw God at work. I saw the face of Jesus in the lonely and unlovable. I felt the exhilaration of doing His work, loving His people.

My own failures, sin, rejection, and loss helped me empathize with my clients. Yet I also knew that facing challenges makes us stronger. We can never really run from our problems or ourselves. I loved being able to pray with and for my clients. It thrilled me when a biblical principle or verse took hold in someone’s life, or when a client realized what we think/believe can transform actions and emotions (Romans 12:2).

God led me in this direction since my youth. I was the Dear Abby for friends as far back as seventh grade. Very few things compare with living out God’s call on your life. So why did I retire early?

I retired from counseling because I wanted a different relationship with those who needed my skills. I didn’t want the ethical boundary forbidding friendship. I wanted the freedom to take food to the sick and hug publically. I wanted to mentor young women or offer parenting advice over a cup of coffee instead of across a counseling office.

Living out God’s call on our lives doesn’t necessarily mean financial compensation for God’s gift. Sometimes we support our call through a different paid vocation. Other times, our vocation and call are the same—whether you’re an accountant, plumber, CEO, or childcare worker. When we use our God given abilities and education for Him, we are doing ministry. One thing is certain, answering God’s call, no matter how difficult, will bring joy.

Periodically, I’ll be sharing God’s lessons on joy. What brings you joy? Is joy and happiness the same thing? I hope we can encourage one another in this journey of joy. Please comment below. I’d be “overjoyed” if you would follow this blog and like us on Facebook. J

Have a joyful day.

How Many Chances?

25 Oct

Do you ever get tired of yourself? A friend recently said, “I get so tired of me.” This person had misplaced something—yet again. Sometimes our bodies disappoint us by not performing as they once did. Maybe we’re sick of an endless cycle of busyness that prevents us from intimacy with God. We may feel defeated by a disagreeable habit. Perhaps we exercised or ate healthy for a time but gradually fell back into our old identity as a snacking-couch-potato. We intend to spend more quality time with family and friends, but good intentions dissolve into procrastination.

At such times, we’re tempted to give up and convince ourselves it doesn’t matter. Jumping off the merry-go-round seems to take more effort or self-discipline than we possess. That’s where I was not long ago.

“But this I call to mind, and therefore I have hope: The steadfast love of the Lord never ceases, his mercies never come to an end; they are new every morning; great is your faithfulness” (Lamentations 3:21–23 NRSV). Every day is a new day with God—for us and for others.

Peter came to Jesus and asked him, “Lord, how often do I have to forgive a believer who wrongs me? Seven times?” Jesus answered him, “I tell you, not just seven times, but seventy times seven. (Matthew 18:21–22 GW). That’s the standard for second chances for others as well as for us.

Rabbis traditionally taught an offended person should forgive three times. Peter, no doubt thought he was generous in proposing seven chances. Not even close. Jesus declares 490+ do-overs. We’re to offer the same limitless forgiveness God offers us. The situation isn’t hopeless even when we offend God by not loving and serving His people, not taking care of His temple (our bodies), or wasting the time He gives. It’s never too late too late for a fresh start.

Receiving another chance doesn’t mean we won’t experiences consequences of past behavior. We lose things, forfeit precious time with God, put on weight, and damage relationships. We may need to ask for help or seek an accountability partner, but a new start is possible.

The solution remains the same—renew our minds and be transformed. Believe the truth. Without realizing it, when we feel hopeless, we believe a lie about who God is and how much He loves us (John 3:16). We also believe a lie about ourselves. We forget Philippians 4:13, “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me (NKJV). I can’t claim this verse and begin performing brain surgery. However, I can accomplish all God uniquely planned for me (Ephesians 2:10).

I find both peace and excitement living in the center of God’s will. I experience anxiety, stress, and frustration doing life on my own. I need the Spirit of Christ to forgive and empower me. I’m so grateful for second chances.

O Lord, you are so good, so ready to forgive, so full of unfailing love for all who ask for your help. (Psalm 86:5 NLT).

Sharing Our Lives

24 Oct

I’ve recognized a common denominator between two retreats I’ve recently attended—WTAMU Wesley women Encounter and Women of Worship. I spoke at the first and attended the second. Both were highly successful because the women involved were able to share their lives with honesty and love. It reminds me of the letter Paul wrote to the Thessalonians.

“So, affectionately longing for you, we were well pleased to impart to you not only the gospel of God, but also our own lives, because you had become dear to us” (1 Thessalonians 2:8 NKJV).

When we genuinely care about people, we’re willing to risk ourselves for their sake. The level of care and vulnerability in leadership made it possible for attendees to open themselves up for healing and spiritual transformation.

As Christians, we often put on masks. We think if people see our weaknesses, they will not only reject us, but will also reject the God whom we love. The opposite is actually true. When we pretend to have all the answers and to live perfect lives, God calls us liars (1 John 1:10) and others label us hypocrites.

“Instead, we will speak the truth in love, growing in every way more and more like Christ, who is the head of his body, the church. He makes the whole body fit together perfectly. As each part does its own special work, it helps the other parts grow, so that the whole body is healthy and growing and full of love” (Ephesians 4:15–16 NLT).

I heard women of all ages and stations in life tell how God redeemed them from sin, suicide, self-righteousness, abuse, and much more. In turn, others were willing to admit their needs and seek help. More importantly, they recognized God as merciful, eager to love and redeem. God lifts us from the ruble of pain and rejection until we recognize ourselves as new creations in Christ—each one His masterpiece. (See Miraculous New Creations.) Some of the women had to move beyond the pain they caused their families and begin to live joyfully forgiven. (See Forgiving Myself.) God prepares us to encourage others by first helping us in our time of trouble.

“All praise to God, the Father of our Lord Jesus Christ. God is our merciful Father and the source of all comfort. He comforts us in all our troubles so that we can comfort others. When they are troubled, we will be able to give them the same comfort God has given us” (2 Corinthians 1:3–4 NLT).

The entire Bible narrates a story of love and redemption. It doesn’t cover-up sin or portray God’s people as perfect—rather as forgiven and transformed. We can identify with the characters of the Bible because they’re real. We too need to be authentic and share the reality of God’s redemptive work in our lives. The resulting joy and power is overwhelming. I’m still praising God for the WT Wesley women and Women of Worship. Thank you for sharing your love, your lives, and the Good News of Jesus Christ.